DJ shocked after ultrasound showed his baby ‘wearing tiny headphones’

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When Emma and Richard Wilkins went for their 11-week ultrasound scan, Leah May was already following in her dad’s footsteps when she looked as though she was kitted out with over-ear headphones.

Leah, who suffers from a genetic disorder that means she is the size of a four-year-old despite being six, is a music lover who is always ready to belt out songs from Frozen and her other Disney favourites.

While it is not clear what caused the illusion, Emma, 33, and Richard, 49, say their daughter even takes the bizarre scan pic to be a sign that music was in her blood.

Emma, from Knaresborough in Yorkshire, said: ‘I’ve not got a clue why she’s got headphones on in the scan – it surprised everybody.

‘The ultrasound technician suddenly pointed and said “Look, the baby has got headphones on!” and sure enough it looked like she did.

‘Everyone was making jokes about it, saying she was going to come out liking music or singing, and it’s true, she loves music now.

‘At the minute it’s all about Frozen – Leah is Frozen-mad and loves all the songs.

‘She has seen the scan photo herself and she finds it funny too.

‘Everyone was making jokes about it, saying she was going to come out liking music or singing, and it’s true, she loves music now.

‘At the minute it’s all about Frozen – Leah is Frozen-mad and loves all the songs.

‘She has seen the scan photo herself and she finds it funny too.

By the time the family had finally got answers, they had already nearly lost her six times.

Emma said: ‘She had so many complications from birth, including failure to thrive, and no one would listen to us.

‘It was heartbreaking when we found out her diagnosis but we finally got answers to what was going on.’

What is DiGeorge syndrome?

DiGeorge syndrome is present from birth and is caused by a problem with the sufferer’s genes, called 22q11 deletion.

It may cause several lifelong problems in the sufferer.

This can include heart defects, learning disabilities, and hormone, speech, hearing and feeding problems.

The severity of the condition differs by person: while some people may die from it, others grow up without realising they have it at all.

After undergoing around 30 gruelling operations that didn’t work, only the gastrostomy and colostomy made any difference to Leah’s health.

The operations mean that brave Leah must be fed through a tube in her stomach for 13 hours every day.

But the little girl doesn’t let that stop her from having fun.

Emma said: ‘Leah just gets on with it now though – she’s a happy little girl and she doesn’t care.’